Interdisciplinary Journal of Virtual Learning in Medical Sciences

Published by: Kowsar

The Role of Social Factors in Students’ Entry to Open and Distance Universities of Iran

Abbas Shayestehfar 1 , * , Mehran Farajollahi 1 and Bahman Saiedipour 1
Authors Information
1 Payam e Noor University, Tehran, Iran
Article information
  • Interdisciplinary Journal of Virtual Learning in Medical Sciences: 10 (1); e87734
  • Published Online: March 14, 2019
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: December 17, 2018
  • Revised: February 25, 2019
  • Accepted: February 26, 2019
  • DOI: 10.5812/ijvlms.87734

To Cite: Shayestehfar A, Farajollahi M, Saiedipour B. The Role of Social Factors in Students’ Entry to Open and Distance Universities of Iran, Interdiscip J Virtual Learn Med Sci. Online ahead of Print ; 10(1):e87734. doi: 10.5812/ijvlms.87734.

Abstract
Copyright © 2019, Interdisciplinary Journal of Virtual Learning in Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnotes
References
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