Interdisciplinary Journal of Virtual Learning in Medical Sciences

Published by: Kowsar

The Explanation of the Curriculum Characteristics of the E-Learning System Based on the Proposed Principles of Constructivist Approach

Tayebeh Dastanpour 1 , * , Hassan Karamalian 2 and Mohamad Reza Sarmadi 3
Authors Information
1 PhD Students, Department of Educational Science, Payam Noor University of Tehran, Tehran, IR Iran
2 PhD, Department of Educational Science, Payam Noor University of Isfahan, Isfahan, IR Iran
3 PhD, Department of Educational Science, Payam Noor University of Tehran, Tehran, IR Iran
Article information
  • Interdisciplinary Journal of Virtual Learning in Medical Sciences: December 2017, 8 (4); e15088
  • Published Online: December 27, 2017
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: October 9, 2017
  • Accepted: December 7, 2017
  • DOI: 10.5812/ijvlms.15088

To Cite: Dastanpour T, Karamalian H, Sarmadi M R. The Explanation of the Curriculum Characteristics of the E-Learning System Based on the Proposed Principles of Constructivist Approach, Interdiscip J Virtual Learn Med Sci. 2017 ; 8(4):e15088. doi: 10.5812/ijvlms.15088.

Abstract
Copyright © 2017, Interdisciplinary Journal of Virtual Learning in Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Context
2. Methods
3. Results
4. Discussion and Conclusion
Acknowledgements
Footnotes
References
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